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Why Medicare Supplement Insurance

Medicare Supplement (a.k.a. Medigap) is private health insurance that helps supplement Original Medicare. Medigap can help you budget your medical expenses month to month. Each plan is standardized by state and federal laws with premiums varying by each state and carrier. Choose from multiple plan options based on your budget and coverage needs.

Supplement Your Medicare and Help Budget Out-of-Pocket Costs

You want to keep your doctors, but you’re tired of covering copays and deductibles. You shouldn’t have to stress about paying for health care in your retirement years. Learn how you can budget your medical expenses with Medicare Supplement (a.k.a. Medigap) insurance.

2020 Medicare Supplement Chart

Works with Your Medicare Parts A&B

Changing coverage options and health care providers can be a hassle. With Medigap insurance, you get to keep your Original Medicare and use your supplemental coverage anywhere that accepts Medicare.

Includes Standardized Benefits

You always know what you’re getting with Medigap insurance. The plans are standardized to follow federal and state laws designed to protect you. That means each standardized policy must offer the same basic benefits, no matter which insurance company you choose.

Little to No Out-of-Pocket Costs

Copays and deductibles can add up. With Medigap insurance, all that—and sometimes more—is covered. Some plans may even cover all of your out-of-pocket costs, so you’re only responsible for paying your plan’s premium.

Learn More About Medicare Supplement Insurance

Medigap Open Enrollment

You can purchase Medicare Supplement insurance at any time, but the best time to do so is during your Initial Enrollment Period (IEP). Your IEP lasts six months and begins the first day of the month in which you are 65 and enrolled in Medicare Part B. If you enroll for Medicare Supplement insurance during this time, the insurance company can’t subject you to medical underwriting. This means, if you have pre-existing conditions, for instance, they can’t increase your premium or deny your coverage.

Medigap Prescriptions

Prescription drugs are a large part of your health care expenses. While Medicare Supplement insurance offers many great benefits, it doesn’t cover prescriptions.

You can get prescription drug coverage through Medicare Part D, and you can have both Medigap coverage and Medicare Part D at the same time. Medicare Part D supplements your Original Medicare Parts A & B coverage. Third-party insurance companies sell Medicare Part D, and those companies determine your out-of-pocket costs.

You can also receive prescription drug coverage through most Medicare Part C (Medicare Advantage) insurance plans. Medicare Advantage replaces your Original Medicare Parts A & B, and like Part D, it’s sold by third-party insurance companies. You cannot have Medigap and Medicare Advantage insurance at the same time.

What Is the Best Medicare Supplement Plan

There are 10 Medigap plans to choose from, each with their own set of benefits. Don’t get stuck with a policy that doesn’t work for your health and budget needs.

Below we’ve outlined some of the most popular Medigap plans, but it’s a good idea to speak with a licensed Medicare agent to determine which policy is best for your budget and health care needs.

What You Need to Know About Plan G

While Medicare Supplement Plan F has been the most popular plan in the past, Medigap Plan G is a close second. With changes coming to the availability of Plan F, it might make sense for you to consider Plan G.

Medicare Supplement Plan G covers the following:

  • Part A coinsurance coverage in addition to 365 extra days in the hospital when Original Medicare coverage ends

  • Part B coinsurance for doctor’s visits as well as outpatient hospital care

  • First three pints of blood annually

  • Part A coinsurance for hospice or skilled nursing care

  • Part A deductible

  • Part B excess charges

  • Foreign emergency care

Medigap Plan G is almost identical to Medigap Plan F. The only difference is that Plan F covers the Part B deductible. However, since Plan G usually has much lower premiums than Plan F, the amount you could save in premiums could be more than the cost of the Part B deductible.

Medicare is also eliminating Medigap Plans F & C in 2020 (both of which cover the Part B deductible) for new entrants to Medicare.

Medigap Plan C

Medicare Supplement Plan C is one of the most popular Medigap plans behind Medigap Plans F, G, and N. You might notice these plans share a lot of similarities. Plan C offers almost the exact same coverage as Plan F, except for Part B excess charges.

While Medigap Plans C and F are more comprehensive, they also usually cost more.

Medicare Supplement Plan C covers the following:

  • Part A coinsurance coverage in addition to 365 extra days in the hospital when Original Medicare coverage ends

  • Part B coinsurance for doctor’s visits as well as outpatient hospital care

  • First three pints of blood annually

  • Part A coinsurance for hospice or skilled nursing care

  • Part A deductible

  • Foreign emergency care

Medigap Plan D

Medicare Supplement Plan D is a fairly complete Medigap plan that covers quite a few deductibles, copayments, and coinsurance fees. It offers similar coverage as Plan F, except for the Part B deductible and Part B excess charges.

Medicare Supplement Plan D covers the following:

  • Part A coinsurance coverage in addition to 365 extra days in the hospital when Original Medicare coverage ends

  • Part B coinsurance for doctor’s visits as well as outpatient hospital care

  • First three pints of blood annually

  • Part A coinsurance for hospice or skilled nursing care

  • Part A deductible

  • Foreign emergency care

Medigap Plan N

At first glance, Medigap Plan N can seem a little confusing. It looks identical to Medigap Plan G, but there’s a subtle difference.

Medigap Plan N does not cover your Original Medicare Part B excess charges. That means, if your doctor charges more than Original Medicare agrees to pay, you’ll be responsible for making up the difference.

Medicare Supplement Plan N covers the following:

  • Part A coinsurance coverage in addition to 365 extra days in the hospital when Original Medicare coverage ends

  • Part B coinsurance for doctor’s visits as well as outpatient hospital care

  • First three pints of blood annually

  • Part A coinsurance for hospice or skilled nursing care

  • Part A deductible

  • Foreign emergency care

Let’s Get Started!

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Medicare is a powerful, but complex, system with a variety of coverage options. Our licensed agents specialize in everything Medicare. That means they can help you determine what combination of coverage is right for you.

Compare Your Options

Not only will our agents help you find the right plan(s) for you, they can also provide quotes from top-rated insurance companies in your area. That way, you only have to make one call to compare your options.

Apply for Your Plan

Find a plan you like, and our licensed agents will help you apply for it over the phone. That way, you don’t have to call the insurance companies directly. We do all the work for you.

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Disclaimer:
* Plans F and G also offer a high-deductible plan in some states. With this option, you must pay for Medicare-covered costs (coinsurance, copayments, and deductibles) up to the deductible amount of $2,340 in 2020 before your policy pays anything. (Plans C and F aren’t available to people who are newly eligible for Medicare on or after January 1, 2020.)
** For Plans K and L, after you meet your out-of-pocket yearly limit and your yearly Part B deductible ($198 in 2020), the Medigap plan pays 100% of covered services for the rest of the calendar year.
*** Plan N pays 100% of the Part B coinsurance, except for a copayment of up to $20 for some office visits and up to a $50 copayment for emergency room visits that don’t result in inpatient admission.